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and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan -- one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not cou
of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a second trip -- and a secretary. they do not think it is smart to protect and as corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild roads and schools or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way where everyone pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that is what i want as well. that is what i have proposed. we can get it done, but we're going to have to make sure people are looking at this irresponsible way, rather than just
friend, and i am glad his dog made it through so he could be here. he is a deficit hawk. more important than that he is a thoughtful and conscious -- voice of a conscious for the senate throughout his term on fiscal responsibility. we worked together in a very effective way to try to bring some sort of bipartisan effort into the requirement that we do something about the debt. it was really, as was mentioned, an idea that we came up with on a long plane ride i think to central america to put together a commission that then threw into the simpson bowls proposal that has become the defining memo for the effort to try to get that is under control. bob zoellick is fond of quoting a friend of his, the foreign minister of australia. we met a few months ago who said to him the united states is one debt deal away from leading the world out of fiscal chaos and disruption. we are. we truly are. we are a nation on the brink of massive economic expansion. from the place that can't is from, north dakota, you see the change in the paradigm on energy. we will go from an important country to exporting.
set our country on a path that will allow us to get our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and septemberer all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they allr today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have you nan hit in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do some
is if there's no change over the next couple of decades, deficits will rise, debt to gdp ratios will rise and our debt would not be sustainable. very important objective for policy is to find a plan to bring the federal budget under control over the next few decades. the second issue, which in some ways seems contradictory to the first, is that we are still in a relatively fragile recovery and we want to avoid taking fiscal action that will push the economy back into recession. that was one of the risks that the fiscal cliff posed. the challenge is to achieve long run sustainability without unduly hampering the recovery which we have. the deal that was struck together with the previous work in 2011 that involved some spending cuts made some progress in both of these goals. sustainability still abil over the decade we have seen improvement in the debt to gdp ratio. there's more work to be done, but some progress there. and in the short run, the fiscal cliff deal on new year's eliminated a good bit of the restrictive components of the fiscal policy that would have had such adverse effects.
in nearly the past three years, and the whole fiasco added to the deficit. host: after the news conference yesterday, house speaker john boehner responded with this statement -- " what are your thoughts on this? if the debt ceiling negotiable. some quick comments -- remember, you can post your comments on twitter. the first phone call is from maryland, a democratic caller, jill. caller: i don't believe the debt ceiling is negotiable. it is kind of ridiculous that the money is already owed, so why are we not going to pay what is owed to other people? if people have made investments, the bills have to be paid. i find it ridiculous that people in congress don't want to pay what is already owed. it does not make sense. host: here is the wall street journal this morning. caller: well, if you're asking me if that's true, i think there definitely needs to be somewhat of a compromise as far as spending cuts, but that is not an easy issue, because spending cuts mean job losses. it's not an easy thing to say a president will say we will stop paying the bills too. so there has to be compromised rehab
on the achievements made in the first term and he looks at this in a broadway because this isn't deficit reduction, for example, is not a goal onto itself. we pursue it in order to help the economy and help create jobs. otherwise it's not worth the effort, in his mind. >> mike pence delivers his first state of the state address tonight. we'll have that live for you at 7:00 p.m. eastern here on c-span. tomorrow, secretary of state hillary clinton testifies on capitol hill on the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. first up, she's before the senate foreign relations committee. that's live at 9:00 a.m. eastern on c-span3. then, in the afternoon the secretary before the house foreign affairs committee. that's set to get under way at 2:00 p.m. eastern. again, both of those hearings live on c-span3. also, c-span.org tomorrow. also tomorrow, the house will postpone a decision, will debate a bill postponing on raising the nation's debt ceiling. you saw pete sessions, the rules committee chairman, filing that rule on the house floor a moment ago. they met this afternoon to discuss the flan whi
. this would give the right signals on energy sources and use. it could raise money to reduce the deficit, restore our infrastructure, speed and finance conservation. there are a number of other commonsense steps that would make progress on carbon pollution and energy conservation goals more significant. the epa should stop dragging its feet permitting old coal plants to continue to spew forth toxic waste, harming the environment and the health of our citizens. it is past time the clean air act reinforced. make sure there are proper safeguards for the cracking technology. make sure this reservoir of inexpensive gas does not undercut the addition of renewables to our energy portfolio. solar, wind, geothermal. dership on these technologies for a balanced energy portfolio and ultimately to reduce our carbon footprint. at each step, we should be looking to enhance energy conservation, because the cheapest kilowatt hour is one that you don't have to generate. we should have a 10-year glide path in support of renewable energy. the wind energy industry has already signaled its reaccept tift just
, if there is new changes in the next couple of decades, deficits will rise, the debt to gdp ratios will rise and our debt will become unsustainable. an important objective for policy is to bring the federal budget under control over the next few decades. as you know, we're still in a relatively fragile recovery and we want to avoid taking fiscal actions that will push the economy back into recession. that was one of the risks that the fiscal cliff pose. tax increases and spending cuts to that size, the cbo and others estimated that unemployment would rise and we very well might go back into a recession. so the challenge is to achieve long run sustainability without unduly hampering the recovery which we have. the deal that was struck, together with the previous work in 2011 that involved some spending cuts made some progress in both of these goals. on longer and sustainability, over the next decade or so, we have seen some movement toward stability in terms of the debt to gdp ratio. more work can be done, for sure. and then, on the short run, the fiscal cliff deal on new year's eliminated a
, we understand what's going on in the debt and deficit and destruction but we have a bunch of debt deniers right now other in the senate that, look, this -- this debt devastate -- devastation that's coming is coming. do we have an obligation to try to find a way to actually get a piece of legislation all the way to the president's desk where we get to start to bend the curve? something beyond the messaging bill to actually an accomplishment. and that's -- and that's going to be the battle. >> you asked if this is a test of the relevance of the conservatives in the conference. i would say that really, most conservatives are willing to suspend disbelief and trust the leadership right now that we'll have a conservative outcome after the last three months. it's really a test of this new pact, if you will, of leadership to get to a 10-year balanced budget, to hold the c.r. at 974. we'll see if those things come to pass. i certainly hope they do. but i would submit to you it's more of a test of what the leadership is going to do than it is of the conservative element. >> i would say it's
can't finish the job of deficit reduction through spending cuts alone. simply put, the president got his tax increases in the last congress. it's time for this congress to tackle washington's spending bing. i'd like to recognize the gentlelady from indiana. >> mr. chairman, my message otoday is simple. on too many big items, congress has been kicking the can down the road for years. it's time to supply real leadership on the most pressing challenges we face. this is the only way we can restore trust in congress. we're fast approaching a dead end. the social security trust fund will be bankrupt in 20 years. medicare and medicaid are not on a sustainable path. it is wrong for us to make proppingses to the american people we know we cannot keep. ms. brooks: we must address the drivers of our debt, medicare, medicaid, an social security. not because these programs don't have merit and certainly not because seniors currently benefiting from them don't deserve with they've been promised. because real leadership isn't about making the easy choice, it's about maybing the right choice. social
. for decades we have piled deficit upon deficit, mortgaging our future and our children's future for the temporary convenience of the present. to continue this long trend is to guarantee tremendous social, cultural, political, and economic upheavals. you and i, as individuals, can, by borrowing, live beyond our means, but for only a limited period of time. why, then, should we think that collectively, as a nation, we're not bound by that same limitation? we must act today in order to preserve tomorrow. and let there be no misunderstanding -- we are going to begin to act, beginning today. the economic ills we suffer have come upon us over several decades. they will not go away in days, weeks, or months, but they will go away. they will go away because we as americans have the capacity now, as we've had in the past, to do whatever needs to be done to preserve this last and greatest bastion of freedom. in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. from time to time we've been tempted to believe that society has become too complex t
makes a point. he tries to make the point that europe should somehow be moving off the policy of deficit reduction. he is completely isolated to your. there is not one single government, not even socialists in europe who believe that you should be pushing our borrowing and borrowing more. that is a simple truth. what is in britain's interest is to seek a fresh settlement in europe that is more flexible, more competitive. that is in our interest. that is what we will seek. but i have to ask him, i have to ask in this. doesn't he understand, doesn't he understand that what has happened over the last decade where a labour government signed a treaty after treaty gave away power after power for more centralization after more centralization? and never consulted the british people has what is made this problem such a big problem in the first place. >> our house in the country -- the prime minister do not after the question as to whether he is given the green light to his cabinet, his conservative members, to campaign some of them being in the opinion and some of them getting out. that is the re
of health care and the size of our deficit. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future.(applause) for we remember the lessons of our past, when twilight years were spent in poverty and parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky, or happiness for the few. we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives, any one of us at any time may face a job loss, or a sudden illness, or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sap our initiative, they strengthen us. (applause) they do not make us a nation of takers; they free us to take the risks that make this country great. (applause) we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to ourselves, but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so
and allow us todú create jobs here. deficit reduction is really good for us. we support the simpson-bowles. it hurts everyone. it shows sacrifice is painful, even for us. he needs stability in the finances of our country. everyone needs to stand up on both sides, republicans and democrats. those are the big issues for us. there is another one that affects innovation. lawyers. from the smallest art to the biggest companies, we need more certainty. dúdo not violate patents and do not peak -- do not put people out of work. dúthere needs to be some certaiy in the system. >> do a lot of members of congresseú -- what do you want them to leave with? >>dúdú we try to reach as many officials as possible. certainly member members of the congressional staff, people from the highway administration, we want people to come here and see the real world. you cannot learn in washington word dealing people who ask are given information. dúshe said, you have to come he. let me tell you, the rules are so tough. they are working the whole time. every major tech company is here. we have 3500 people
to get our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. talk didn't come here to about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a
would be able to reduce the deficit by $150 billion. not a bad idea. and then if you could do all this and would only cost the average driver less than $1 per week per car, would that be a reasonable burden to impose? so i'm floating the idea. we are beginning discussions with senator mark warner of virginia. he was part of the gang of six, gang of eight. we are encouraged by what we're hearing from him. chairman bill shuster in the house came to our meeting in pittsburgh in november, and he said, listen, folks, we know that the central question congress will have to address next year is revenue. we are open to ideas. no guarantee that they can pass anything. but bill shuster is open to any and all ideas. so what i'm asking you to do is to join us in the battle that lies ahead this next couple of years and demand that congress provide long-term funding for transportation. you know, the big issue that every member of congress is concerned about is with deficits, long-term fiscal viability of the country and cutting spending and raising revenue, that combination is what people seem
make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause] we remember the lessons of our past, years spent in poverty, the parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. we do not believe that freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the few. we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives, any one of us, at any time, may face a job loss or a sudden illness, or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments that we make to each other through medicare, medicaid, social security, they do not sapped our initiative, they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers, they free us to take risks to make this country great. host: the top republican in the senate responded to the president's address saying that he congratulated the president on his inauguration and that he wished him well in his duty to lead the u.s. at home and a
reduced the federal deficit even by a dollar. we are not going to get out of this overnight. this would allow us to keep reducing the deficits. we have a shared value in eliminating waste, fraud, and abuse. we are intent on that. host: how much of the budget does waste, fraud, and abuse make up? guest: i could go back to virginia beach, virginia, and we could identify waste every day. we will never eliminate it entirely. we can do a better job. it will take reforms. we are living longer and we have fewer people paying in. i want to protect those who are hurting the most, like art, who called in earlier. host: lester is a republican. caller: good morning. disability, 63 years old. my wife still works. $45,000 a less taw less than year. somehow someone is going to have to do something about this. guest: i agree completely. i believe it is immoral for one generation to pass on debt that dims their future. those who have served our country -- i am mindful of the price paid by our goldstar families. we're failing the young people. i am with you. i was over it. i believe when americans are gi
house caprettto prioritize the government's bills. guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake a deficit-reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a dead beat nation, really. i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know firsthand, second-hand, but much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, some of them realize the potential consequences. host: if president obama won on the fiscal cliff d
the government running. we need a plan to slowly on the but surely walk our nation out of debt, deficit, and decline. this debatealf, -- is often argued in numbers and figures, but it is really about families like yours that bear the burden of a slow economy. constant uncertainty and ever changing government rules that cesare jobs overseas. de to day jobs pay less. -- day to day jobs pay less. we need to address the most pressing economic challenges. you deserve better. with the swearing in of a new congress and the inauguration of president obama, this is an opportunity for a new start. republicans will not provide a blank check for more spending and the rational borrowing and constant tax increases. we need to have a washington budget and not a family budget. budget and not a family budget.
the government running. it will be planned to slowly but surely, what our nation out of debt, deficit, and declined garrett on your behalf, we will insist the democrats who run the rest of washington to the same. this debate is often argued in numbers and figures but it is really about and families like yours that bear the burden of a slow economy. constant uncertainty and. ever-changing government rules chase our jobs and opportunities overseas. when day to day life costs more and jobs pay less, we do not solve the problem by delaying our cattle decision -- spending decisions, raising taxes, or refusing to answer the most pressing economic challenges. with the swearing in of a new congress and the inauguration of president obama, this is an opportunity for a fresh start. government debt affects all of us. republicans will not to to provide a blank check for uncontrolled spending and constant nickel and dime tax increases. we should gut washington's budget, your budget. these are the challenges of our times. we have the guidance of great leaders in the past who have faced tougher chal
in the late 1980's when we didn't have to talk about how to pay for disaster assistance because the deficit was only $3 trillion. but we've so badly mismanaged our money after that, by the time we got to hurricane katrina in 2005, that we actually did start talking about offsetting and paying for disaster relief and paid for and offset about 40% of it. but we didn't learn. we didn't learn from those mistakes and we've continued to mismanage our money and to run up our deficit to such a point now where we're at $16 trillion today and it's incumbent upon us to have the discussion about whether or not we have the money to do this. and whether or not it's important enough to us to pay for it. i wish very much that we weren't here today. i wish very much that we could pass this and easily borrow the money, without any questions whatsoever. but we've wasted that opportunity. we've mismanaged our own finances to the point where we are now no longer capable of taking care of our own. think about that for a second. in the united states of america we do not have enough money to take care of our own c
budget deficit and debt, the committee sees that the budget deficit will continue to decline over the next two years. but we do not characterize the debt and deficit at unsustainably high levels. we do think the deficit is reduced to $925 billion in 2013 and narrowed further, to $728 billion in 2014. that is down from $1.1 trillion last year. that gives you an overview of the committee consensus opinion and i would be happy to answer any additional questions you might how about the committee's outlook. i will be happy to entertain other questions as well. yes? >> just to clarify a little bit on the gdp dragon on the tax hike, was that on the payroll and income tax increases? >> that is correct. >> the 1.25% dragon, was out for the whole year? -- the 1.25% drag, was that for the whole year? >> we think it will be for the whole year of fiscal 2013. >> with the labour market and some improvement on as quick as it was, without just -- there was some sentiment that it might be slowing down. >> we are seeing drags on consumer spending, but also from the ongoing recession in europe and j
] [applause] >> former senators kent conrad and judd gregg lead a discussion on debt and deficit issues like it 8:30 a.m. here on c-span 2. at 1:00 p.m. eastern, new immigration legislation, live from the national press club on c-span 2. >> why did you write a book about your experience? >> it was an important part of history. i felt the fdic perspective should be brought to bear. there had been some other accounts of the crisis that i thought were not completely accurate, especially in terms of what we did and what i did so with the was important for a historical record to present our perspective and also, currently, for people to understand that there were different policy choices, a different policy options and disagreements and that if we want to prevent this crisis from happening again, i really felt the public themselves need to engage more in financial reform and educate themselves better and make it an issue with their elected officials. i wanted to make the book accessible and i had recommendations to help them do that. >> the former head of the federal deposit insurance corporation
running. most importantly, there will be a plan to slowly, but surely walk our nation out of debt, deficit and declined. on your behalf, we will insist that the democrats to run the rest of washington do the same. this debate is often argued in numbers and figures, but it is really about families like yours that bear the burden of a slow economy, constant uncertainty, and ever-changing government rules that chase jobs and opportunity overseas. one day to day life costs more, and jobs pay less, we do not solve the problem by delaying decisions, raise taxes, or refusing to tackle the most pressing economic challenges. you deserve better. with the swearing in of a new congress and the inauguration of president obama, this is the opportunity for a fresh start, but because government debt affects all of us, republicans will not simply provide a blank check for uncontrolled spending , a rational borrowing, and constant nickel and dime tax increases. the issues that we face today are not an impossible obstacle. they are merely the challenges of our time. we have the guidance of great leaders of t
of these issues. >> if the deficit can only be resolved in increasing taxes and cutting expenses. what expenses would you cut? >> i don't believe we should cut across the board. we should cut strategically. s there -- there is fat, no question about it. i would start there. there is no question that this defense budget is bloated. i'm speaking -- i can tell you the mayors of the country want to see less spending on defense and more spending on bridges and roads and highways and schools. investments that will bear dwiveds down the line. i also said -- i'm a democrat and this does not fly with some democrats but you have to look at some entitlements. you can be for entilettlement reform and not want to turn health care into vouchers. i can tell you mayors have gotten the support of pension reform. there's a number of things we can do that don't decimate the safety net but do, you know, make the kinds of investments. a balanced approach is the only way to deal with deficits at the level and debt at the level that we have in the nation today. it is the only path forward. >> should president obama i
to prioritize the government's bills. what's wrong with that idea? guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had over $2 trillion. we had 1.5 trillion that came from previous actions. and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reductions through some increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. so we have already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we have never tried that before. host: is it feasible? guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills do you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a deadbeat nation really, and i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know, if i might say so, if not firsthand, secondhand, much of the leadership within the house republican caucus, not all of it, i think some realizes the potential consequences. host: if
this. yes, it may run up the immediate deficit, but once again, for every dollar that we invest in those levees we not only save lives and property, but we put people to work and we get the economic engine going. further up in my district, again, along the sacramento and the rivers, i have a project that's 44 miles of levee that clearly will fail. it has failed four times in the last 60 years. lives have been lost. one of the most catastrophic failures of a levee happened in this stretch of river. we need to rebuild that. the federal government's role in these construction projects of these levees has gone back to the very beginning of this nation and it is congress' task to allocate the money to decide the projects that are going to be built. but unfortunately we tied ourselves in knots here with certain rules that have been put in by our republican colleagues that prevent us from taking the necessary action to protect our communities. we're not talking about, you know, willy nily unnecessary projects. we're talking about saving -- nilly unnecessary projects. we're talking abou
and deficit. >> that is absolutely true, these will be two big issues. on the gun-control issue, but no one is talking about taking everyone's guns away. they are talking about sensible, common-sense measures to prevent some of the tragic incidents we have seen recently, in newtown, aurora, colorado. i think there will be time to get into the thick of these issues after tomorrow, but tomorrow will be a chance for the president, really, to bring the country together and say we need to reach common ground on some of the major problem we face. >> you were inside the bush white house. the president put on the table two big domestic agenda items, immigration reform, primarily because his own party said no, and social security reform. >>what advice would you give president obama, based on the lessons that you saw firsthand with president bush? >> the advice i would give to him is you cannot go wrong by doing what you promised you would do, by pressing the agenda and you promised the voters you promised you would press, and you have to be willing to face the consequences. when president bush was r
marijuana will reduce the deficit, increase revenue, increase jobs. decrease crime in half. host: so what do you think about the strategy from house republicans? what do you think specifically on this as a strategy? caller: i think it's just a big joke. without new revenue. they know. they don't care that we're going down the tubes. they don't care about sese quest ration. now they are talking about the construction industry is going crazy. we need more cheap labor from third world countries. like that's going to help. host: ela is on our democrats line from charlotte, south carolina. you're on. what do you think about this proposal? caller: i think it's crazy. because the president is not going to go for it. he has already said that he wants a clean debt ceiling bill. not three months that we have to go through the same thing again. he wants it for a whole year. so i don't understand why the republicans are doing this. they know they are not going to get it. they are not going to get this, so this is wasting precious time. they should do the debt ceiling for a whole year. host: so ella, hol
they need to put inshunes on a gun like you do a car. host: so often we focus on the u.s. debt or deficit, we have exceeded now the dealt limit of $16.4 trillion. you can see in the upper left-hand side the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salaries, and $1.5 ode to military contractors and other commitments. consider again that day on february 15 f that is the day we reach the limit, the country would not have enough money to pay the bond holders let a
ground sell. especially with issues like debt and deficit dealing with what ever happens on gun control, they have a big heavy docket already. there are a lot of reasons this could still stumble. >> on the issue of guns and gun violence, the story on -- available on line with the headline in -- we asked him, what will pass? guest: i wish i knew. i would hope we could close the gun show loophole. which could limit the size of magazines. i would hope that we would have background checks the same for everybody and actually have some teeth and took them. host: what would the senate passed? what will house republican support with a twist on guns? guest: let's begin with the process that he will hold a hearing. he will hold a hearing and try to see what consensus can develop out of there. he is critical to this. the lot would come through his committee. the speech he game at georgetown on wednesday. i came away from their unsure of how far he is willing to go. he said he would be willing to take a look at an assault weapons ban, which he voted for in 1994. he said he told an interesting story
and spend. let's not talk about the deficit. let's talk about gun control. these priorities are skewed. host: that was stated in the bronx, new york. we want to show you a video of harry -- talking about presidential artifacts. >> part of it is just about the enthusiasm. are meant to be days of national celebration and national unity. they are not always that way, but they are souvenirs' that .eople may create in the days of george washington, there were bronze buttons and pendants that people could buy things from --that people could buy. i particularly like this, a glass tray, sold on that day. it is to mimic a card. it has generally 20th, 1961, marking president kennedy costs of moving. moving.dy's the idea that people get license plates -- these are good for a day or a week. you can put them on the -- under cars. you are part of the celebration. go to the parade. this happens to be kennedy in 1961. you can watch the crowd up above for those of us who are a little bit shorter. we see these kinds of continuity, this ongoing, both the material and this expression of exuberance in a lot of t
of the lines of the deficit and the mention of newtown and other issues, but notably on immigration reform, he just sort of sat there while other members did applaud. whether or not you can read something into that, i am not sure, but it is definitely an opportunity for reaction on the other side. host: to all of these issues we have been addressing the last hour, i want to look at something your colleague wrote in "the washington post." "if the president can reach a broad deal that settles some of the disputes over entitlement spending and tax code and govgiving the government borrowing authority to last through much of the term, he can use that energy to forge a bipartisan, rise on these other big issues to." guest: that is a huge point. one point that ms. mcconnell, republican leader in the senate, has made over and over again is the reason they are using to get them as leverage is they feel the urgency of the issue, and one of the things he said in the past few weeks was that if obama does come to the table and helps to craft a big deal, both sides can agree to, he will be able to move on
a fifth year in a row where we are going to have a deficit exceeding a trillion dollars a year. that's the greatest threat to the middle class in america and we are committed to trying to address that problem. that's one of the reasons why i voted against the fiscal cliff deal. the president called for a balanced approach. i think his approach raising taxes is not the way to grow our economy. nonetheless, he indicated there would be spending cuts. there were not. in fact there were spending increases in that bill. host: fix boxer's original assault gun ban. echoing a recent poll that said 30% of those polled are dissatisfied with gun laws, want to see them strengthened. not specific gun laws but, you know, saying we need to reinstitute the assault weapons ban and fix it. guest: well, the evidence -- again, we are certainly willing to listen to proposals that are offered by the president and his commission and by others, but the original assault weapons ban was not a meaningful law because it did not distinguish between the so-called assault weapon and other types of firearms that fir
. the problem is if you'd inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put out a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to get out of that, and it is difficult for or organizations to think about releasing the information before it is out for. -- asked for. i have been involved in several situations where the information was available and understandable. it mitigated some concerns. it was difficult to make that transparent, and catching up with that is really difficult. one reason for the impact was the lack of information as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. as a context for moving beyond the research done, what do you think the larger research agenda ought to be about? >> the hydrocarbons in the continental shelf and inland areas are pretty well known. it is the deep sea we did not have information for. i think the deep sea ecosystem is an area we need to emphasize, and some of the longer living organisms such as marine mammals. one of the issues is the effect of multiple stressors. we have some smart jury is that were heavily oiled, and s
to new gun laws. >> tomorrow, former senators conrad and grade lead a discussion on deficit issues. we will be live starting at 8:30 a.m. eastern on c-span to. and at 1:00 p.m. eastern, chamber of commerce president thomas downey year -- thomas donahue called for immigration legislation. we will be live from the national press club also on c- span to. -- c-span 2. >> he talked about the dream he had, he talked about for years, the american dream. it had been his dream. and he was in detroit a few months before. he talked about -- i have a dream that america will someday realize its principals in the declaration of independence. so i think he is just inspired by that moment. >> sunday, claiborne carson recalls his journey as a civil- rights activist, participating on the 1963 march on washington. it is part of three days of the tv this weekend, monday featuring authors and books on the inauguration. >> president obama officially launched his effort to reduce gun violence wednesday, calling for action in congress and signing 23 executive orders to deal with the issue. speaking before an
and the size of our deficit. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future.(applause) our past, when twilight years were spent in poverty and parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky, or happiness for the few. responsibly we live our lives, any one of us at any time may face a job loss, or a sudden illness, or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sap our initiative, they strengthen us. (applause) they do not make us a nation of takers; they free us to take the risks that make this country great. (applause) we, the people, still believe that our obligations as americans are not just to ourselves, but to all posterity. we will respond to the threat of climate change, knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. (applause) so
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